What The Press Is Saying

Hey, retirees: Go and spend some money

"Go spend some money" was my message...And based upon the report "Living Too Frugally? Economic Sentiment & Spending Among Older Americans," by Matt Fellowes, CEO of United Income, it's probably appropriate for a lot more people.

About 57 million Americans have no emergency savings

Older Americans have also become steadily more pessimistic about their economic prospects, according to a separate study by United Income, a start-up that aims to apply big-data analysis to financial planning.

Why Retirees Shouldn’t Shun the Stock Market

Americans age 65 and older were less likely than all other age groups to believe that the stock market would rise each year between 2002 and 2014, according to a recent study by United Income Inc., a registered investment advisor that serves retirees.

How to spend your money in retirement without dying broke

Americans are leaving increasingly larger sums of money behind, according to new research from Washington, D.C.-based advisory firm United Income.

Are You Preventing Yourself From Having Your Dream Retirement?

Overly negative viewpoints toward the future may also create self-fulfilling economic problems if they lead to an overly aggressive fixed-income portfolio. To assess these possibilities, we at United Income (a new money management system designed to bring retirement dreams to life) analyzed consumer sentiment and spending data.

What They Won’t Tell You About Retirement

In the United States, the average American over 60 reduces the amount they spend by about 2.5 percent a year, according to United Income, a financial planning software company.

Adults increasingly less optimistic over financial well-being, study says

According to a recent study by United Income, a startup financial planning service, adults are becoming less optimistic about future economic growth and financial health as they age.

Not saving for retirement tops Americans' greatest regrets

Older Americans have become steadily more pessimistic about their own future economic prospects, according to a separate study by United Income, a startup that aims to apply big-data analysis to financial planning.

Frugal retirees ditch 4% rule, hoard savings instead

Retirees may be overly pessimistic about their future financial health and that may lead them to spend less than they could otherwise, according to a new study by United Income, a startup that aims to apply big-data analysis to financial planning.

Spend it if you got it: How frugal retirees impact all of us

As outlined in [Matt Fellowes’] recent report analyzing data from two University of Michigan surveys sponsored by federal agencies, the average adult aged 60 years or older will trim his or her spending by about 2.5 percent every year, or approximately 20 percent over a 10-year period.

Parents don’t be too proud to beg and plead. Cry if you must. Just get your college graduate to start saving for retirement now!

“The average retired adult who dies in their 60s leaves behind $296,000 in net wealth, $313,000 in their 70s, $315,000 in their 80s, and $238,000 in their 90s,” according to a United Income report.

Sometimes, retirees are just too frugal

Matt Fellowes, CEO of United Income, offered this decline in optimism as one possible explanation for the drop in spending as retirees age.

Older Americans Are Less Confident in Stocks -- and That's a Problem

According to a newly released study by United Income, between 2002 and 2014, the average older adult thought the stock market had a less than 50% chance of increasing on an annual basis -- even though most major indexes increased in all but two years during this period.

This week in money

The average American over the age of 60 cuts spending by 2.5 per cent per year, or about 20 per cent over a 10-year period, according to an analysis of University of Michigan survey data by financial planning software company United Income.

We Know Where All the Money Is Hiding

Retirees who are usually expected to spend that hard-earned nest egg are instead cutting their spending and living frugally, according to a University of Michigan survey analyzed by software company United Income.

Is there really a retirement-savings crisis in the US?

A new study by United Income considers the question from a different angle. It suggests that, due to a pessimistic economic outlook, retirees are simply living more frugally — and leaving behind significant financial assets at death.

Local news coverage on Fox affiliates

A new report from the investment company United Income says the wealthiest 25% of retirees are sitting on their money.

Pessimistic Investment attitude harms Retirees

According to Matt Fellowes of United Income, the benefits of living longer lives, and the relief that comes with retirement could be lessened if older households become overly cautious concerning spending and investing with the onset of age.

WSJ Wealth Adviser Briefing: Retiree Pessimism, Benchmarking for RIAs

…for those who have saved diligently, “they are not enjoying retirement in the way they should,” says Mr. Fellowes, who plans to launch an online financial advisory service aimed at people 50 and over this summer.

Why rich retirees are so reluctant to spend their money

Financial planners need to help retirees realize they have a “cognitive bias” that makes them too gloomy about the future, said United Income's Mr. Fellowes.

Frugal retirees ditch 4 percent rule, hoard savings instead

Retirees may be overly pessimistic about their future financial health and that may lead them to spend less than they could otherwise, according to a new study by United Income, a startup that aims to apply big-data analysis to financial planning.

The Psychological Reason Older People Spend Less

…for those who have saved diligently, “they are not enjoying retirement in the way they should,” says Fellowes, who plans to launch an online financial advisory service aimed at people 50 and over this summer.

American retirees are hoarding their cash and many are even RICHER in their 80s than in their 60s

These findings were reported in a study by the University of Michigan, which conducted a survey in conjunction with United Income, a financial planning software company.

Fear Keeps Older Americans from Experiencing Dream Retirement

Innovations in medicine and technology have extended human life by over 30 years since 1900, which has helped to double the amount of time the average adult now spends in retirement compared to several decades ago, notes Matt Fellowes, CEO of United Income in a report.

Are Older Americans Being Too Cautious With Saving and Spending?

Despite retirement industry suggestions that Americans should draw down less income in retirement, Fellowes’ paper suggests older Americans are not spending enough to live their retirement dreams.

Retirees Are Too Pessimistic on Their Investments—And It's Costing Them

Younger cohorts consistently had more faith, according to a study from United Income, a company developing money-management services for older Americans.

Rich Retirees Are Hoarding Cash Out of Fear

Millions of Americans are living too frugally, said Matt Fellowes, United Income’s CEO. Retirees are entering their 80s richer than they were in their 60s and 70s.

How Millions of Aging Baby Boomers Could Bust the Economy

New research by United Income, an investment advisory service in Washington, D.C., shows that Americans’ pessimism and unease about the state of the economy and their own future financial well-being grows the longer they live.

Why Retirees Cut Back on Spending: A Growing Pessimism, It Seems

But for those who have saved diligently, “they are not enjoying retirement in the way they should,” says Mr. Fellowes.

Six common myths that can mess up your retirement

Spending can vary by 50 percent or more per year for retired households, according to research by Matt Fellowes, founder and CEO of United Income, a startup that aims to apply big-data analysis to financial planning.

63% of workers say they will need less than $1 million for retirement

“Just like past stock performance does not predict future stock performance, past spending does not predict future spending,” Fellowes said.

Retirees, Automate Your Spend-Down Plan

United Income will help retirees build portfolios of bond ladders, deferred annuities and other investments; tell them which accounts to tap first; and send them a regular retirement paycheck.

HelloWallet Founder Matt Fellowes Has a New Financial Services Startup

“Ads for retirement finances spend most of the time talking about saving for retirement, not managing money for retirement,” Fellowes said. “It’s a very different problem for people.”

He sold his first local financial startup for $52.5M. Now he’s launching another in D.C.

Fellowes launched financial services startup United Income in D.C. this week to provide financial planning and money management services to the people who need it most — the ones switching to fixed incomes and at the start of drawing down a lifetime of savings.

Fintech Startup Aims to Help Boomers Manage Retirement Income

Fellowes promises United Income will integrate all sources of potential income in a way current retirement planning software doesn’t.